August 2019 Philosophy Walk (Missoula/Huson): Reconnecting with Nature

We had a great time on our first Missoula county Philosophy Walk! Big thank you’s to the 9 Mile Community, Steve King, and Deborah Slicer and to the numerous community members, visitors from out of state (The Kramer clan!), and University of Montana students who came out to participate in the fun! Thank you also to Mother Nature for providing such a beautiful setting for our meandering. Led by 2019 Merlin Student Scholar Fellow & Philosopher, Henry Kramer, and Grants Manager & Humanitarian, Ryan Aikin, on this walk (a “spin-off” of our August Helena Philosophy Walk) we explored the importance of “reconnecting with nature” through the lens of phenomenology and animism. Access resources & photos here!

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August 2019 Philosophy Walk (Helena): Reconnecting with Nature

We were blown away by how amazing our August Philosophy Walk was…beautiful weather, wonderful people, great questions, and thought-provoking discussion led by 2019 Merlin Student Fellow & Philosopher, Henry Kramer, and Grants Manager & Humanitarian, Ryan Aikin. Our group of 17 — including 3 delightful young philosophers who joined us for the journey — enjoyed a lovely hike on the Waterline & Rodney Ridge Trails and explored “reconnecting with nature” through the lens of phenomenology, pragmatism, and animism. Access resources & photos here!

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Philosophy Walk

Please join us for our mid-morning philosophy walk on Saturday, August 3rd from 9am-12pm.  Topic:  Reconnecting with Nature. Special guest speakers/philosophers-on-trail — Ryan Aikin (Grants Manager, Youth Homes & Humanitarian) & Henry Kramer (2019 Merlin Student Fellow & Philosopher, University of Montana Missoula). This walk will be a casual, free-flowing conversation about…

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June 2019 Philosophy Walk: Envrionment, Ethics & Stewardship

How we relate to nature is complicated and ever-evolving. Our group — led by co-philosophers-on-trail Christopher Preston & Patrick Kelly — enjoyed a morning & afternoon walk up the steep slopes of the 1906/Prairie trail to the summit of Mt. Helena, and explored a number of topics related to environment, ethics, the public trust doctrine, and stewardship. Access resources & photos here!

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Philosophy Walk

Please join us for our philosophy walk on Saturday, June 29th from 9am-12pm where we’ll be exploring environmental ethics, technology, and conservation & land ethics.   Special guest speakers/philosophers-on-trail — Christopher Preston (Professor of Philosophy, University of Montana Missoula) & Patrick Kelly (Philosopher & Conservationist, University of Montana Missoula).  Some of the…

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A Phenomenology of Mass-Produced Things and Our Relation with the More-than-human World

In this paper, Henry Kramer, explores the human-technology relationship and argues that “our perception of mass-produced things, a perception unique to and only possible within technological culture, dulls our senses and de-emphasizes the basic materiality of all things, thereby discouraging connection and engagement with the more-than-human world.” An iteration of this paper was presented at the 16th Annual Gonzaga Graduate Philosophy Conference and received the Hutchins Award in Philosophy for best paper in the conference.  It is featured here on our website by permission of the author. Read more here!

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Philosophy Walk (Part 2 of 3 – Fall Series)

Please join us on Saturday, November 10th on Merlin Nature Preserve for the second in our Fall-Winter philosophy walk series in conjunction with our Fall-Winter Philosophy Symposium Series about the environment, ethics & conservation stewardship. This walk will explore the topic of landowner/steward-wildlife and habitat relationships, including agricultural and ranching relationships.…

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Ethics, Artificial Intelligence & The Real World

In the wake of increasing concerns about AI and the somewhat predominant “lack of ethical considerations” in the industry relative to its possible social ramifications, universities and researchers are pushing hard to establish a new ethos of “first, do no harm.” But the task is daunting for a number of reasons.

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