When Our Elders Die: A Confucian Perspective on Grief & A Language Lost

When we lose our elders, our worlds are silenced. Tis’ the ineffable weight of loss and sadness and a language lost. This thoughtful & beautifully written article by Amy Olberding, Professor of Philosophy at University of Oklahoma, explores grief & loss through the eyes of Confucian philosophy.

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Ethics, Artificial Intelligence & The Real World

In the wake of increasing concerns about AI and the somewhat predominant “lack of ethical considerations” in the industry relative to its possible social ramifications, universities and researchers are pushing hard to establish a new ethos of “first, do no harm.” But the task is daunting for a number of reasons.

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Dancing with Death: The Vital Relationship Between Mortality & Love

Losing loved ones can be one of the hardest challenges a person must face. How do we navigate our loss, pain & grief? And what does death have to do with love? In this article, Sharon Krishek — lecturer in philosophy at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem — talks about the vital relationship between mortality and love as seen through the eyes of existentialist philosopher Søren Kierkegaard.

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What Philosophy & Anthropology Can Tell Us About Being Human

What does it mean to be human? This age-old question has occupied thinkers of all sorts for centuries and has produced a plethora of valuable insights, from philosophers to anthropologists, religious scholars to physicists…and many more. In this article, Dr. Brian Morris — Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at Goldsmiths, University of…

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Wildlife Management & Policy: Disease and De-listing

In these two articles, wildlife management and policy regarding disease control and the endangered species act are explored.  While measures aimed at controlling the spread of disease are not as controversial, the de-listing of once endangered species remains a highly debated topic. Article 1 In this article, chronic wasting disease…

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The Ethics of Hunting: Some Philosophical Questions to Consider

In these two articles, some philosophical questions about the morality of hunting are explored. Article 1 In the first article, “Is Hunting Moral?  A Philosopher Unpacks the Question,” Philosophy Ph.D. candidate, Joshua Duclos, discusses: Some of the rationales for why people hunt — conservation, subsistence, and trophy/sport hunting What bothers…

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The History of Hunting and Conservation: Ethical Dilemmas & Concerns

The relationship between hunting and conservation has a long, complex history and poses numerous ethical dilemmas. On one side of the argument is the claim that hunting fees help fund conservation; on the other side is the claim that these benefits are exaggerated and that killing game animals is wrong. In between…

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Neuroscience: A New Model for Punishment & Reform?

In this article of the Atlantic, neuroscientist and author, David Eagleman, examines our criminal-justice system and the brain and advocates for a more “biologically-informed jurisprudence.”  Why?  “Acts cannot be understood separately from the biology of the actors, says Engelman, ” and this recognition has legal implications.” This (among other obvious…

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