Wildlife Management & Policy: Disease and De-listing

In these two articles, wildlife management and policy regarding disease control and the endangered species act are explored.  While measures aimed at controlling the spread of disease are not as controversial, the de-listing of once endangered species remains a highly debated topic. Article 1 In this article, chronic wasting disease…

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The Ethics of Hunting: Some Philosophical Questions to Consider

In these two articles, some philosophical questions about the morality of hunting are explored. Article 1 In the first article, “Is Hunting Moral?  A Philosopher Unpacks the Question,” Philosophy Ph.D. candidate, Joshua Duclos, discusses: Some of the rationales for why people hunt — conservation, subsistence, and trophy/sport hunting What bothers…

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The History of Hunting and Conservation: Ethical Dilemmas & Concerns

The relationship between hunting and conservation has a long, complex history and poses numerous ethical dilemmas. On one side of the argument is the claim that hunting fees help fund conservation; on the other side is the claim that these benefits are exaggerated and that killing game animals is wrong. In between…

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Neuroscience: A New Model for Punishment & Reform?

In this article of the Atlantic, neuroscientist and author, David Eagleman, examines our criminal-justice system and the brain and advocates for a more “biologically-informed jurisprudence.”  Why?  “Acts cannot be understood separately from the biology of the actors, says Engelman, ” and this recognition has legal implications.” This (among other obvious…

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Can Philosophy Help Us Get Beyond Anger?

Anger is an emotion that has (sadly) seemed to imbue our politics and culture.  Thankfully, claims Martha Nussbaum —  Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago — philosophy can help guide us out of this “dark vortex.” In this timely article, Nussbaum considers…

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The Generative Power of Being Wrong

Being wrong is not often glorified.  But there is great value in being wrong.  According to Daniel Dennett — American philosopher & cognitive scientist known for his research on philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, and philosophy of biology — “the history of philosophy is in large measure the history…

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Can Stoicism Help Tame Frustration?

Frustration is not a foreign concept.  We have all experienced it — some more than others and for a variety of reasons.  But does this mean that frustration is an inevitability?   According to Albert Ellis — founder of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy — the answer is no. While…

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The Modernity of Aristotle’s Political Philosophy

Think that the political philosophy of Aristotle is out-dated?  Think again.  In this article, Matt Qvortrup — Professor of Political Science at Coventry University — explores the surprising modernity of Aristotle’s works & its relevance to current day politics.   When thinking about government, for example, consider Aristotle’s claim in The…

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