The Ethics of Hunting: Some Philosophical Questions to Consider

In these two articles, some philosophical questions about the morality of hunting are explored. Article 1 In the first article, “Is Hunting Moral?  A Philosopher Unpacks the Question,” Philosophy Ph.D. candidate, Joshua Duclos, discusses: Some of the rationales for why people hunt — conservation, subsistence, and trophy/sport hunting What bothers …

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The History of Hunting and Conservation: Ethical Dilemmas & Concerns

The relationship between hunting and conservation has a long, complex history and poses numerous ethical dilemmas. On one side of the argument is the claim that hunting fees help fund conservation; on the other side is the claim that these benefits are exaggerated and that killing game animals is wrong. In between …

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Neuroscience: A New Model for Punishment & Reform?

In this article of the Atlantic, neuroscientist and author, David Eagleman, examines our criminal-justice system and the brain and advocates for a more “biologically-informed jurisprudence.”  Why?  “Acts cannot be understood separately from the biology of the actors, says Engelman, ” and this recognition has legal implications.” This (among other obvious …

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Can Philosophy Help Us Get Beyond Anger?

Anger is an emotion that has (sadly) seemed to imbue our politics and culture.  Thankfully, claims Martha Nussbaum —  Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago — philosophy can help guide us out of this “dark vortex.” In this timely article, Nussbaum considers …

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The Generative Power of Being Wrong

Being wrong is not often glorified.  But there is great value in being wrong.  According to Daniel Dennett — American philosopher & cognitive scientist known for his research on philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, and philosophy of biology — “the history of philosophy is in large measure the history …

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Can Stoicism Help Tame Frustration?

Frustration is not a foreign concept.  We have all experienced it — some more than others and for a variety of reasons.  But does this mean that frustration is an inevitability?   According to Albert Ellis — founder of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy — the answer is no. While …

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The Modernity of Aristotle’s Political Philosophy

Think that the political philosophy of Aristotle is out-dated?  Think again.  In this article, Matt Qvortrup — Professor of Political Science at Coventry University — explores the surprising modernity of Aristotle’s works & its relevance to current day politics.   When thinking about government, for example, consider Aristotle’s claim in The …

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Leadership, Climate Change & Philosophy of Sport

The Olympics are about a lot of things. For this athlete, they are about trying to bring awareness and a sense of urgency to the threat & impact of climate change. Despite the fact that David Katoatau did not win a medal…he brings new meaning to the words “inspiration”, “champion”,  …

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