Philosophy Think & Drink

Reeder's Alley (Pavilion/Gazebo) 119 Reeder's Alley, Helena

Our Think & Drink gatherings are monthly (dojo) sessions that consist of a “meeting of the minds” over libations. An open mind & desire to engage in thoughtful dialogue (whether from a listening or contribution standpoint) is all that’s needed! Learn more here!

Reading Together: Shop Class as Soulcraft

Reeder's Alley Interpretive & Convention Center 101 Reeder's Alley, Helena, MT

In this philosophy read-in we'll explore Matthew Crawford's book Shop Class as Soulcraft.  Accessible and insightful, the book offers a critical assessment and argument for the value of the trades and working with one's hands. Join us for two weeks -- on Thursday nights from 6-8pm. Learn more & RSVP here.

Class Series: Philosophy Through Geometry

Reeder's Alley Interpretive & Convention Center 101 Reeder's Alley, Helena, MT

Ancient authors tell us that, at the door to Plato’s Academy, there was a sign which read “Let no one who does not geometrize enter here.” Regardless of the literal truth of that story, the practice of geometry clearly held an important place in the Academy, and in the ancient Greek philosophical tradition more generally. Over the course of four weeks together, we’ll explore some of the reasons why. This exploration will combine hands-on, practical, collaborative work in doing geometry, with philosophical reading and reflection on what we’re doing, and why it matters. This is not a "math class." Each and every week, we’ll combine four different elements: Practical exercises in geometry, short readings from the dialogues of Plato, ideas drawn from other ancient philosophers like Aristotle, Euclid, Iamblichus, and Proclus, and lively & active conversation and collaboration, as a community of learners, exploring together the interplay of these philosophical and geometrical themes. Learn more and register here!

How Did We Get Here?: Planet

Reeder's Alley Interpretive & Convention Center 101 Reeder's Alley, Helena, MT

In this installment of “How Did We Get Here?”, we’ll consider the intellectual history of the idea of “planet” with mathematician, physicist, and astrophysicist Kelly Cline. We'll start with the ancient Greeks, move to Copernicus, and then sashay into the 20th century. Along the way we'll learn about how scientific words and their definitions serve as a specific lens through which we can view the world. By scientifically defining words so that they most closely match real categories that exist in physical reality, this makes it easier for us to understand, investigate, and make sense of the universe. As such, this installment of HDWGH and the evolution of how we understand and use the word planet will give us important insights into the nature of science and the foundations of our modern civilization. Learn more & RSVP here.

Reading Together: Shop Class as Soulcraft

Reeder's Alley Interpretive & Convention Center 101 Reeder's Alley, Helena, MT

In this philosophy read-in we'll explore Matthew Crawford's book Shop Class as Soulcraft.  Accessible and insightful, the book offers a critical assessment and argument for the value of the trades and working with one's hands. Join us for two weeks -- on Thursday nights from 6-8pm. Learn more & RSVP here.

Class Series: Philosophy Through Geometry

Reeder's Alley Interpretive & Convention Center 101 Reeder's Alley, Helena, MT

Ancient authors tell us that, at the door to Plato’s Academy, there was a sign which read “Let no one who does not geometrize enter here.” Regardless of the literal truth of that story, the practice of geometry clearly held an important place in the Academy, and in the ancient Greek philosophical tradition more generally. Over the course of four weeks together, we’ll explore some of the reasons why. This exploration will combine hands-on, practical, collaborative work in doing geometry, with philosophical reading and reflection on what we’re doing, and why it matters. This is not a "math class." Each and every week, we’ll combine four different elements: Practical exercises in geometry, short readings from the dialogues of Plato, ideas drawn from other ancient philosophers like Aristotle, Euclid, Iamblichus, and Proclus, and lively & active conversation and collaboration, as a community of learners, exploring together the interplay of these philosophical and geometrical themes. Learn more and register here!

Class Series: Philosophy Through Geometry

Reeder's Alley Interpretive & Convention Center 101 Reeder's Alley, Helena, MT

Ancient authors tell us that, at the door to Plato’s Academy, there was a sign which read “Let no one who does not geometrize enter here.” Regardless of the literal truth of that story, the practice of geometry clearly held an important place in the Academy, and in the ancient Greek philosophical tradition more generally. Over the course of four weeks together, we’ll explore some of the reasons why. This exploration will combine hands-on, practical, collaborative work in doing geometry, with philosophical reading and reflection on what we’re doing, and why it matters. This is not a "math class." Each and every week, we’ll combine four different elements: Practical exercises in geometry, short readings from the dialogues of Plato, ideas drawn from other ancient philosophers like Aristotle, Euclid, Iamblichus, and Proclus, and lively & active conversation and collaboration, as a community of learners, exploring together the interplay of these philosophical and geometrical themes. Learn more and register here!

Philosophy Think & Drink

Reeder's Alley (Pavilion/Gazebo) 119 Reeder's Alley, Helena

Our Think & Drink gatherings are monthly (dojo) sessions that consist of a “meeting of the minds” over libations. An open mind & desire to engage in thoughtful dialogue (whether from a listening or contribution standpoint) is all that’s needed! Learn more here!

Class Series: Philosophy Through Geometry

Reeder's Alley Interpretive & Convention Center 101 Reeder's Alley, Helena, MT

Ancient authors tell us that, at the door to Plato’s Academy, there was a sign which read “Let no one who does not geometrize enter here.” Regardless of the literal truth of that story, the practice of geometry clearly held an important place in the Academy, and in the ancient Greek philosophical tradition more generally. Over the course of four weeks together, we’ll explore some of the reasons why. This exploration will combine hands-on, practical, collaborative work in doing geometry, with philosophical reading and reflection on what we’re doing, and why it matters. This is not a "math class." Each and every week, we’ll combine four different elements: Practical exercises in geometry, short readings from the dialogues of Plato, ideas drawn from other ancient philosophers like Aristotle, Euclid, Iamblichus, and Proclus, and lively & active conversation and collaboration, as a community of learners, exploring together the interplay of these philosophical and geometrical themes. Learn more and register here!

Philosophy Workshop: “Friendship & Actions” Reading & Discussion

Reeder's Alley Interpretive & Convention Center 101 Reeder's Alley, Helena, MT

In his Handbook, the Stoic philosopher Epictetus tells us that “the appropriate actions for us to do are usually measured out for us by our relations.”  Epictetus suggests that we can see how to act fittingly in any given situation, based on how we are related to the other people involved, whether as family members, friends, fellow citizens, enemies, or in whatever other way. In this reading & discussion, we’ll use some extended quotations from Simplicius’ commentary as a springboard for reflecting on friendship, and on the appropriate actions that arise from our relationships more generally.  Learn more & RSVP here.

Philosophy Workshop: “Ways of Knowing”

Reeder's Alley Interpretive & Convention Center 101 Reeder's Alley, Helena, MT

Most of us have the basic intuition that, because the truth “always is what it is”then there shouldn’t really be different “kinds” of knowing: we either know, or we don’t know, and that’s that.  Knowledge, like truth, should be objective and invariable. Yet many of us also have another intuition: sometimes, there really does seem to be “something different” about knowing, or about acquiring knowledge, in different ways. In this workshop we'll apply some traditional tools, along with our own careful analytic skill, to see what we can salvage from both intuitions. We’ll identify, as best we can, what each intuition gets right, as well as how they fit together in a coherent way. Critically, we’ll learn to appreciate the difference between knowing, as an activity that we do, and knowledge, as a thing that we have. Learn more & RSVP here.

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