Philosophy Symposium: “The Environment, Ethics & Stewardship” (Part 3)

This interactive Q & A-style symposium is part 3 (of a 3-part series) on the environment, ethics & conservation stewardship and features a distinguished panel of invited guest speakers from a variety of disciplines. This evening symposium will be held at Carroll College.  Invited speakers will briefly address the theme…

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Philosophy Walk (Part 3 of 3 – Fall Series)

Please join us on Sunday, March 3rd from 10am-1pm for the third in our Fall-Winter philosophy walk series in conjunction with our Fall-Winter Philosophy Symposium Series about the environment, ethics & conservation stewardship. This walk will explore the topic of current & future environmental and conservation challenges. Guest Speakers/Co-Philosophers-on-Trail:  Thomas Baumeister,…

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The Democracy of Wolf Conservation

No other species on this planet elicits stronger emotions in us than the wolf. This should come as no surprise. After all, it’s the wolf which has been in our presence the longest, it’s the wolf with whom we’ve shared our ancestral dwellings and whose descendants we keep as pets today, and it’s the wolf who has shaped our humanity and our relationship to wildness like no other. In this article, 2019 Merlin Community Scholar Fellow Thomas Baumeister, discusses the role of adaptive management, pragmatism, and engaged citizenry in wolf conservation.

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Measure of the Hunt: Elk Deserve Better

Elk are elk and their worth does not rely on us, though it is influenced by our ability to identify and communicate that value. If we truly love and appreciate elk, it’s time for hunters to reclaim the ethical highroad of fair chase hunting that honors elk for what they are and demands the hunter to be the very best he or she can be. In this article, 2019 Merlin Community Scholar Fellow Thomas Baumeister, discusses two different “measures” of hunting, how fairness and respect are part and parcel of reverence, and why reinstating the ethical pursuit of the hunted as a measure is important.

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Theodor W. Adorno: The Culture Industry (Part 2)

This article, written by Merlin volunteer and scholar Jonathan Drake, explores the work of Theodor W. Adorno and offers an analysis of his philosophical reflections on the “culture industry,” Marx’s commodity fetishism, mass media, and the liberating potential of art.

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Theodor W. Adorno: An Introduction (Part 1)

A founding member of the Frankfurt School and the philosophical style known as critical theory, Theodor W. Adorno’s contributions continue to have an impact on philosophical, sociological, and aesthetic thought. This article, written by Merlin volunteer and scholar Jonathan Drake, offers an introduction to his works and influence, as well as some important clarifications about his critique of western philosophy and the enlightenment.

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Philosophy Workshop: Ethical Living Through Self-Knowledge (Winter 2018)

Philosophers of the ancient world consistently describe understanding ourselves and our place in the wider world as one of the first steps toward living well.  In this 3-hour “philosophy as a way of life”-inspired workshop led by special guest & Princeton scholar, David Nowakowski, PhD (Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Union College), we looked at some of the insights provided by Ancient Greek thinkers concerning questions of self, free-will, responsibility, happiness, and more. View photos & access resources here!

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2018-2019 Philosophy Symposium – “The Environment, Ethics & Stewardship” (Part 2)

Our 2018-2019 Philosophy Symposium Series “The Environment, Ethics & Stewardship” looked at numerous philosophical issues & perspectives related to ethics, the environment, and conservation stewardship, ranging from public vs. private land (including individual rights, collective rights, indigenous rights, other); landowner/steward-wildlife and habitat relationships, and; current & future environmental/conservation challenges. At this symposium, five panelists from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds focused on the second of these three areas of discussion and spoke for 7-10 minutes each. Then the forum was opened up to free-flowing audience-panelist Q & A. Access audio-video, photos & more here!

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