Reading & Discussion Series: Exploring the Republic

Why is it worthwhile to act justly, even if we could “get away” with injustice?  Doesn’t the successful thief or tyrant have a life that’s attractive and enviable? How does the kind of society that we live in shape our character, values, and attitudes as individuals?  Is it even possible to be a healthy person, in a society that’s profoundingly sick and unbalanced? Over the winter and early spring, we’ll be exploring these and other main themes from Plato’s Republic.  For 5 every-other-Wednesday sessions, we’ll balance our time and attention between close reading of Plato’s text, and considering the implications of Plato’s arguments for our own lives and times. Learn more & RSVP here!

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Reading & Discussion Series: Exploring the Republic

Why is it worthwhile to act justly, even if we could “get away” with injustice?  Doesn’t the successful thief or tyrant have a life that’s attractive and enviable? How does the kind of society that we live in shape our character, values, and attitudes as individuals?  Is it even possible to be a healthy person, in a society that’s profoundingly sick and unbalanced? Over the winter and early spring, we’ll be exploring these and other main themes from Plato’s Republic.  For 5 every-other-Wednesday sessions, we’ll balance our time and attention between close reading of Plato’s text, and considering the implications of Plato’s arguments for our own lives and times. Learn more & RSVP here!

Continue reading

Reading & Discussion Series: Exploring the Republic

Why is it worthwhile to act justly, even if we could “get away” with injustice?  Doesn’t the successful thief or tyrant have a life that’s attractive and enviable? How does the kind of society that we live in shape our character, values, and attitudes as individuals?  Is it even possible to be a healthy person, in a society that’s profoundingly sick and unbalanced? Over the winter and early spring, we’ll be exploring these and other main themes from Plato’s Republic.  For 5 every-other-Wednesday sessions, we’ll balance our time and attention between close reading of Plato’s text, and considering the implications of Plato’s arguments for our own lives and times. Learn more & RSVP here!

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Workshop Series: Reading Myths Philosophically (Session 2)

Myths—inspired stories which relate “things which never happened at any particular time, but which always are,” in one ancient author’s memorable phrase—have played an important role in wisdom traditions around the world. But the role of myth is often woefully misunderstood in our contemporary society, where myths are seen as mere fiction, falsehood, or silly stories that “other people” tell who are “too ignorant to do science,” the way “we” do. In this two-part series, we’ll try to recover a richer, more robust understanding of myth, with the help of some Platonist philosophers of the 3rd-5th centuries, who defended and explained mythic modes of knowing for an age, much like ours, in which elite opinion scorned traditional myths. Learn more & RSVP here.

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Workshop Series: Reading Myths Philosophically

Myths—inspired stories which relate “things which never happened at any particular time, but which always are,” in one ancient author’s memorable phrase—have played an important role in wisdom traditions around the world. But the role of myth is often woefully misunderstood in our contemporary society, where myths are seen as mere fiction, falsehood, or silly stories that “other people” tell who are “too ignorant to do science,” the way “we” do. In this two-part series, we’ll try to recover a richer, more robust understanding of myth, with the help of some Platonist philosophers of the 3rd-5th centuries, who defended and explained mythic modes of knowing for an age, much like ours, in which elite opinion scorned traditional myths. Learn more & RSVP here.

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September 2022 Philosophy Symposia Series: Gaia & Indigenous Perspectives on Nature

In this symposia series, led by guest scholars Martin Ogle and Lailani Upham we explored our relationship with nature as viewed by Gaia Theory & Indigenous worldviews, respectively. Events involved discussions and reflections about the inter-connectivity of earth (and its numerous inhabitants), mythology, science, literature, and ethics. Access audio-video, resources & photos here!

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Class Series: Philosophy Through Geometry

Ancient authors tell us that, at the door to Plato’s Academy, there was a sign which read “Let no one who does not geometrize enter here.” Regardless of the literal truth of that story, the practice of geometry clearly held an important place in the Academy, and in the ancient Greek philosophical tradition more generally. Over the course of four weeks together, we’ll explore some of the reasons why. This exploration will combine hands-on, practical, collaborative work in doing geometry, with philosophical reading and reflection on what we’re doing, and why it matters. This is not a “math class.” Each and every week, we’ll combine four different elements: Practical exercises in geometry, short readings from the dialogues of Plato, ideas drawn from other ancient philosophers like Aristotle, Euclid, Iamblichus, and Proclus, and lively & active conversation and collaboration, as a community of learners, exploring together the interplay of these philosophical and geometrical themes. Learn more and register here!

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Class Series: Philosophy Through Geometry

Ancient authors tell us that, at the door to Plato’s Academy, there was a sign which read “Let no one who does not geometrize enter here.” Regardless of the literal truth of that story, the practice of geometry clearly held an important place in the Academy, and in the ancient Greek philosophical tradition more generally. Over the course of four weeks together, we’ll explore some of the reasons why. This exploration will combine hands-on, practical, collaborative work in doing geometry, with philosophical reading and reflection on what we’re doing, and why it matters. This is not a “math class.” Each and every week, we’ll combine four different elements: Practical exercises in geometry, short readings from the dialogues of Plato, ideas drawn from other ancient philosophers like Aristotle, Euclid, Iamblichus, and Proclus, and lively & active conversation and collaboration, as a community of learners, exploring together the interplay of these philosophical and geometrical themes. Learn more and register here!

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